Dublin City

The Spire

The Spire

Dublin (from the Irish, Baile Átha Cliath, meaning “the town of the ford of the hurdles”) is the capital city of Ireland and a must-see for all visitors to the Emerald Isle. Home to more than a third of the Republic of Ireland’s population and rich with heritage, it claims a powerful literary culture.

Many of its leading tourist attractions can be found in a relatively compact area stretching North and South across the River Liffey, the South side being the more arty, affluent and fashion-conscious area of the city, a reputation held-down in the stimulating Grafton Street and the bohemian Temple Bar districts. The North side, home to Dublin’s working class and the true Dublin accent, claims to have the liveliest nightlife in the city. Dublin’s charm is not limited to the city centre, however. Visitors should also take advantage of the beautiful shoreline, which accommodates enjoyable seaside strolls and cliff-top walks.

A city of both heritage and conflict, its origins date back to the 9th century, when Viking Norsemen established a trading post on the River Liffey’s southern back in order to take advantage of Dublin Bay’s strategic location. The city thereafter was conquered by the Anglo-Normans during the 12th century, and finally lost its independence with the passing of the 1801 Act of Union, following the 1798 Rebellion.

Governed by a British vice-regent, the city soon fell into a period of economic decline. Continual calls for self-rule, coupled with efforts to bring a sense of Irish national consciousness to the city, resulted in the foundation of the Gaelic League in 1893. This group, with its efforts to revive both the Irish traditional culture and language, laid the groundwork for the Celtic literary revival. However, measures towards the preservation of Irish tradition did not temper the political struggles for independence. The Easter Rising of 1916 may have heralded the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1921; it also nurtured political divisions within a country on the verge of civil war.

The establishment of independence led to a period of emigration and austerity, which in turn prevented Dublin from a promising future unburdened by its colonial past. But the past two decades have seen Dublin involved in an extensive process of regeneration, most visibly in the reinvigorated Temple Bar area. An influx of migrants from Africa and Eastern Europe, in addition to the long established Chinese community, have encouraged a very diverse and multicultural environment and with it a bounty of ethnic fashions and culinary intrigues.

Unmissable Attractions in Dublin

1. Bohemian Football Club (Opening times vary depending on the game)

2. Blessington Street Basin (Opening Times: Monday to Sunday from dawn till dusk)

3. Playing Field (Opening Times may vary)

4. Light House Cinema (Opening times vary depending on the movie) Prices vary

5. The Joinery (Opening Times vary depending on the event) Prices vary

6. National Wax Museum (Opening Times: Monday to Sunday from 10.00 a.m. – 7.00 p.m.) Prices: Adults €12.00 / Children €8.00 / Senior citizens €9.00 / Students €10.00 / Family €35.00

7. Custom House (Opening Times: Monday to Friday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.30 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 2.00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m. in summer / Wednesday to Friday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.30 p.m. and Sunday from 2.00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m. in winter) Prices: Adults €1.00 / Students go free / Family €3.00)

8. The General Post Office (Opening Time: Monday to Saturday from 8.30 a.m. – 6.00 p.m.)

9. The Spire of Dublin

10. The Dublin Writers Museum (Opening Times: Monday to Saturday from 10.00 a.m. – 5.00 p.m. and Sunday from 11.00 a.m. – 5.00 p.m.) Prices: Adults €7.50 / Children €4.70 / Concessions €6.30 / Family €18.00

11. The Hugh Lane Gallery (Opening Times: Tuesday to Thursday from 10.00 a.m. – 6.00 p.m. Friday and Saturday from 10.00 a.m. – 5.00 p.m. and Sunday from 11.00 a.m. – 5.00 p.m.)

12. Jeanie Johnston Tall Ship and Famine Museum(Opening Times: Monday to Sunday from 10.00 a.m. – 4.00 p.m.) Prices: Adults / €8.50 / Children €4.50 / Senior citizens €7.50 / Students €7.50 / Family €20.00

13. The Gate Theatre (Opening Times: Monday to Saturday from 10.00 a.m. – 7.00 p.m.) Prices vary

14. Garden of Remembrance (Opening Times: Monday to Sunday from 8.30 a.m. – 6.00 p.m. in summer / Monday to Sunday from 9.30 a.m. – 4.00 p.m. in winter)

15. James Joyce Cultural Centre (Opening Times: Tuesday to Saturday from 10.00 a.m. – 5.00 p.m. and Sunday from 12.00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m.) Prices: Adults €5.00 / Senior citizens and students €4.00)

16. Croke Park and the GAA Museum is home to the Gaelic Athletic Association and one of the finest museums in Dublin. (Opening Times: Monday to Saturday from 9.30 a.m. – 5.00 p.m. and Sunday from 12:00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m.) Prices: Adults €6.00 / Students €4.00

17. The city’s most popular and vibrant pubs are nestled next to the Irish Film Institute. In combination with several arts galleries, the area constitutes the cultural hub of Ireland.

18. Dublin Castle is situated in the very heart of Dublin City, on the south side of the River Liffey (Opening Times: Monday to Saturday from 10.00 a.m. – 4.45 p.m. and Sunday from 12.00 p.m. – 4.45 p.m.)

19. Christchurch Cathedral contains underground crypts, relics from ancient pilgrimages, mummified animals, and one of the country’s most popular choirs (Opening times vary throughout the year)

20. The world famous Saint Patrick’s Cathedral (Opening Times vary throughout the year) Prices: Adults €5.50 / Students €4.50

21. At the Old Jameson Distillery, learn about the legendary history of Jameson Irish Whiskey and the proper way to mix and drink it. The distillery is located at Bow Street, Smithfield Village (Opening Times: Monday to Saturday from 9.00 a.m. – 6.00 p.m. and Sunday from 10.00 a.m. – 6.00 p.m.) Prices: Adults €13.00 / Students €10.60

22. The Brazen Head, reputedly the oldest pub in Ireland, has operated from this site since 1198.

23. St. Michan’s Church (Opening Times: Monday to Friday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.45 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. – 4.45 p.m. and Saturday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.45 p.m. in summer / Monday to Friday from 12.30 p.m. – 3.30 p.m. and Saturday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.45 p.m. in winter) Prices: Adults €4.00 / Children €3.00 / Senior citizen and students €3.50 / Family €12.50

24. The Four Courts

25. The Ha’penny Bridge

26. Guinness Storehouse (Opening Times: Monday to Sunday from 9.30 a.m. – 5.00 p.m.) Prices: Adults €14.85 / Children €6.50 / Senior citizens and students €13.00 / Family €40.00

27. Saint Stephen’s Green is one of the largest and most visited public parks in Dublin. The lake, arboretum, bandstand, statues, and flower displays make it a nice place to relax after a busy day. Trinity College, one of Dublin’s top tourist destinations, is free to visitors.

28. The National Museum of Ireland contains what is perhaps the single greatest collection of Ireland’s material, cultural and natural history (Opening Times: Tuesday to Saturday from 10.00 a.m. – 5.00 p.m. and Sunday from 2.00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m.

29. The National Library of Ireland, located in Kildare Street, is a popular place for public talks, readings, exhibitions, and for researching family genealogy (Opening Times: Opening times vary throughout the week) / Genealogy Advisory Service (Opening Times: Monday to Wednesday from 9.30 a.m. – 7.00 p.m. Thursday and Friday from 9.30 a.m. – 4.45 p.m. and Saturday from 9.30 a.m. – 4.30 p.m)

30. The National Gallery of Ireland is home to the national collection of European and Irish fine art (Opening Times: Monday to Saturday from 9.30 a.m. – 5.30 p.m.)

31. Grafton Street, running from Stephen’s Green to College Green, is one of the main shoping areas in Dublin.

32. Trinity College, one of Dublin’s top tourist destinations, is free to visitors.County Dublin, Dublin Region


Dublin Hotels

Radisson BLU Hotel, Dublin Airport (https://www.radissonblu.com/en/hotel-dublinairport)
Jurys Inn Dublin Christchurch (https://www.jurysinns.com/hotels/dublin/christchurch)
Maldron Hotel Pearse Street (http://www.maldronhotelpearsestreet.com/)
Castle Hotel (http://www.castle-hotel.ie/)
Maldron Hotel Smithfield (http://www.maldronhotelpearsestreet.com/)
Staycity Aparthotels Saint Augustine Street (http://www.staycity.com/dublin/st-augustine-street/)
DoubleTree by Hilton Dublin Burlinton Road (http://doubletree3.hilton.com/en/index.html/)
Temple Bar Inn (http://www.templebarinn.com/)
The Ripley Court Hotel (http://www.ripleycourt.com/)
Maldron Hotel Dublin Airport (http://www.maldronhoteldublinairport.com/)
The Fitzwilliam Hotel (http://www.fitzwilliamhoteldublin.com/)
Radisson BLU Royal Hotel Dublin (https://www.radissonblu.com/en/royalhotel-dublin)
Drury Court Hotel (http://www.drurycourthotel.ie/)
Ballsbridge Hotel (http://www.ballsbridgehotel.com/)